The Man from Providence
by Jeffrey Cranor

#29

Dream of Seekonk—ebbing tide—bolt from sky—exodus from Providence—fall of Congregational dome.





Excerpt
There are clouds. Black clouds, and it’s still bright out, like incandescence. Along the highway and over the people gathered there.

The people staring upward and spaced evenly along the black-topped road. And the dark sky. People are purple outlines, and I can’t make out faces, but I know them all.




                                                         traffic
                                                                         ZOOMS
                    BY
                                                                                        US
       DODGING
                                                                         each person.
                                                                                            It seems so
                                                         reckless.




I wait
to witness
a
disaster.

About the Author

Jeffrey Cranor is an ensemble member with the performance art collective the New York Neo-Futurists. He writes and performs short plays weekly for their ongoing show Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind. He also co-wrote and performed in the Neos’ full-length play (Not) Just A Day Like Any Other, for which he won a 2009 NY Innovative Theater Award for Ensemble Performance. He has also collaborated with choreographer and wife Jillian Sweeney on two solo shows: Imaginary Lines (2007) and This Could Be It (2009). As a playwright, his stage adaptation of Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno was performed at Kitchen Dog Theater (Dallas), and his short plays have been performed at Ground Zero Theater (Dallas), ArtSpirit (Dallas), 24HTP (Northampton, MA), and Naked Theater (Northampton). Jeffrey has performed in and directed plays at Naked Theater and Present Theater Project in Northampton. At PTP in 2006, Jeffrey directed Will Eno’s The Flu Season. Jeffrey has a BS in Journalism from Texas A&M University, and he lives in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.